Double D “Fried” Chicken

I do love fried chicken. I do hate frying chicken. Frying chicken is messy and adds a lot of fat to chicken. To get around this, a lot of us do a “fried” chicken in our ovens and smokers. I have my own version, BBQ “Fried” Chicken.

Oven chicken can make a nice crispy “fried” chicken, but can it give the thick crunchy coating you get with double dipped fried chicken? This is my attempt to find out.

I did this recipe in my Traeger Timberline and the circulating air did a great result. However, you could do the recipe on a tray over a rack in a 400 F (205 C) oven.

I started by cutting a chicken into pieces. Instead of cutting chicken into pieces you can just use chicken pieces. However, the chicken must have skin on for this to work. Most of the fat in chicken is at the skin and it helps make the great coating.

To cut the chicken, I started by cutting down both sides of the backbone and removing it. I save it for making stock. Then I put the point of a heavy knife into the joint of the drumsticks and cut them off. I cut the thighs off the body of the chicken.

I worked the point of the knife into the joint attaching the wings to the chicken and cut them off. I cut the breasts into two halves and cut across both halves to make four breast sections.

This gave me ten chicken pieces. As I said, you can just use 1.2 to 1.5 kg (2 ½ to 3 pounds) skin on chicken parts.

I mixed up a marinade of:

  • 500 ml (2 cups) milk
  • 25 ml (2 tablespoons) Sriracha or Buffalo wing sauce
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) salt
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) sugar
  • 1 egg

Mix the ingredients together and pour them over the chicken in a nonreactive container. Put it in the fridge for 3 hours to marinade, stirring around twice.

Mix up a coating mix of:

  • 350 ml (1 ½ cup) flour
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) your favourite barbecue rub
  • 6 ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) salt
  • 6ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) onion powder
  • 6 ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) garlic powder

For the next steps, send your wife out of the room. If she sees what a mess you are going to make you will get the hairy eyeball and a serious tongue clucking. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Make a dipping station. Put the container with the marinade on the left. Next to it, put the coating mix in a low casserole or tray. To the right of the coating mix, put a large plate or tray.

Lift a chicken piece out of the marinade with your left hand. Lay it on top of the flour in the casserole. Shovel flour over the chicken with your dry right hand to coat. Lift the chicken out of the flour with your dry right hand and put it on the plate. Repeat with each piece putting on the plate in a single layer.

Move the chicken on the plate to the left of the marinade and put another large plate to the right of the coating mix. Lift a piece of chicken with your left hand and dip it in the marinade. Put the chicken on the flour mixture with your left hand. Shovel flour over it with your dry right hand. Lift the piece out of the mixture with your dry right hand and put it on the clean plate. Repeat to give each piece the second dip and coating and put in a single layer on the clean plate.

Let the chicken rest for 15 minutes for the coating to set up.

I put the chicken, skin side up, in a 400 F (205 C) smoker for about 35 minutes. The chicken should just start to be getting some golden on the edges of the chicken.

Brush the chicken pieces with oil. Do not turn them.

Cook for 30 minutes more and start checking the chicken. When the chicken is browned as much as you like, check the internal temperature to make sure it is over 170 F (75 C) and take off the smoker (it will likely be way over 170 F (75 C)). This can take up to 40 minutes depending on the air circulation in your smoker.

Let the chicken rest for 5 minutes and serve.

I have done a video of this recipe.

The Verdict

This is incredible chicken. It isn’t just crispy, it crunches. The coating has a well seasoned taste and the chicken is tender and moist. You must try this.

The Old Fat Guy

Double D “Fried” Chicken

Double D “Fried” Chicken

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ to 3 pound chicken cut up or skin on chicken parts
  • Marinade:
  • 500 ml (2 cups) milk
  • 25 ml (2 tablespoons) Sriracha or Buffalo wing sauce
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) salt
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) sugar
  • 1 egg
  • Coating:
  • 350 ml (1 ½ cup) flour
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) your favourite barbecue rub
  • 6 ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) salt
  • 6 ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) onion powder
  • 6 ml (1 ¼ teaspoon) garlic powder
  • For Brushing:
  • 75 ml (1/3 cup) vegetable oil

Instructions

  1. Mix marinade ingredients together. Add chicken and marinate for 3 hours, stirring twice.
  2. Mix coating ingredients together.
  3. Make a dipping station. Put the container with the marinade on the left. Next to it, put the coating mix in a low casserole or tray. To the right of the coating mix, put a large plate or tray.
  4. Lift a chicken piece out of the marinade with your left hand. Lay it on top of the flour in the casserole. Shovel flour over the chicken with your dry right hand to coat. Lift the chicken out of the flour with your dry right hand and put it on the plate. Repeat with each piece putting on the plate in a single layer.
  5. Move the chicken on the plate to the left of the marinade and put another large plate to the right of the coating mix. Lift a piece of chicken with your left hand and dip it in the marinade. Put the chicken on the flour mixture with your left hand. Shovel flour over it with your dry right hand. Lift the piece out of the mixture with your dry right hand and put it on the clean plate. Repeat to give each piece the second dip and coating and put in a single layer on the clean plate.
  6. Put the chicken, skin side up, in a 400 F (205 C) smoker for about 35 minutes. The chicken should just start to be getting some golden on the edges of the chicken.
  7. Brush the chicken pieces with oil. Do not turn them. Cook for 30 minutes more and start checking the chicken. When the chicken is browned as much as you like, check the internal temperature to make sure it is over 170 F (75 C) and take off the smoker (it will likely be way over 170 F (75 C)). This can take up to 40 minutes depending on the air circulation in your smoker.
  8. Let the chicken rest for 5 minutes and serve.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://oldfatguy.ca/?p=7458

13 thoughts on “Double D “Fried” Chicken”

  1. Good morning David. What a great idea! Anything to decrease the amount of extra fat in the diet during these challenging sticking around the house times.

    Have you tried the recipe with buttermilk? It tends to be my go-to for fried chicken brining.

        1. Not so much. My Timberline has great temperature control through the racks and I put it on the upper racks just because it was convenient. However, if your smoker has a hotter more direct heat on the lower racks, higher racks might be a better idea.

  2. Dave! This was so good! We did it yesterday for dinner. Even the husband said it was good. He doesn’t often trust me when I do something like this on our Traeger!

  3. Dave, the nerd herd in Louisiana says your chicken is the BOMB! Made it on our Traeger this evening. Things we found: ours cooked a LOT faster than yours did. Our T has a 375 degree setting, and then bumps up to high/450 (it’s the Junior model we got on a deal at Costco – we want a bigger one now!). So my husband set it at 375. We thought it might take a bit longer at the lower temp, and also because I bought a pack of chicken legs for this recipe, and they were mutant huge chicken legs. Not so. He let the chicken cook for 40 minutes, and when he went to brush the oil on, he could visibly watch the chicken getting crispy as he brushed it. It was at 180 and climbing, so we called it good and took it off. Not sure if it cooked faster because our T is smaller, or if it’s hotter in Louisiana, or because of the brisk breeze, or what.

    We set it up on a rack and let it drain while I was making mashed potatoes. It was crunchy and delicious! Being from Louisiana, next time we make it, I’ll ramp up the seasonings a bit – that’s how we roll, ya know. But we will definitely be making it again! The husband thinks we might ought to try turkey legs this way. Thank you for a wonderful addition to our recipe stash!

    1. Thanks so much for letting me know. A buddy who has an older Traeger says his cooked faster too. On looking at his unit, it gives a lot more radiant heat from the bottom than my Timberline and I think that is the cause. I’d love to hear how it turns out on Turkey legs!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *