Smoke Au Vin

I am not big on classic French cooking, but I do love Coq Au Vin. The French braised chicken dish has that delicious wine, onion, and herb flavour that is the signature of French cooking.

The problem with the dish is that it takes several steps and a lot of time. I had a chicken I had cut up and wondered if I could introduce those flavours into chicken made in my Traeger Timberline smoker.

While I made this in my smoker, it could be prepared in an oven or over indirect heat in a barbecue.

I cut a 1.2 kg (2 1/2 pound) chicken into pieces, but you could use 2 to 3 pounds of chicken pieces. If you would like to see how to cut a chicken up, see my video:

How to Cut A Chicken In Pieces

Put 250 ml (1 cup) red wine, 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme, and 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary in a nonreactive container and put the chicken pieces in. Add 175 ml (3/4 cup) of diced onion and 3 cloves garlic, finely diced. Cover the container and put it in the fridge overnight.

Take the chicken out of the marinade and discard the marinade. Put the chicken on a rack and pat it dry with a paper towel.

Mix a rub of:

  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) coarse pepper
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) Kosher salt

Sprinkle it over all sides of the chicken pieces. Let them sit for 30 minutes.

I put the chicken in a preheated 350 F (176 C) smoker. Cook it to an internal temperature of 170 F (77 C) in the thickest piece of chicken. It took about 1 hour 15 minutes in my smoker.

Bring the chicken in and let it rest for 5 minutes.

Serve.

The Verdict

This was very tasty chicken. It had flavours of Coq Au Vin but, of course, It didn’t have the classic sauce. I loved the wine and herbs. The skin was tasty while the flesh was moist.

I will make this again.

The Old Fat Guy

Smoke Au Vin

Smoke Au Vin

Ingredients

  • 1 to 1.5 kg (2 to 3 pounds) chicken pieces
  • 250 ml (1 cup) dry red wine
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary
  • 175 ml (3/4 cup) diced onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) coarse pepper
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) Kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Cut a 1.2 kg (2 1/2 pound) chicken into pieces, but you could use 2 to 3 pounds of chicken pieces.
  2. Put 250 ml (1 cup) red wine, 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme, and 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary in a nonreactive container and put the chicken pieces in. Add 175 ml (3/4 cup) of diced onion and 3 cloves garlic, finely diced. Cover the container and put it in the fridge overnight.
  3. Take the chicken out of the marinade and discard the marinade. Put the chicken on a rack and pat it dry with a paper towel.
  4. Mix a rub of 5 ml (1 tsp) dried rosemary, 5 ml (1 tsp) dried thyme, 5 ml (1 tsp) coarse pepper, 5 ml (1 tsp) Kosher salt
  5. Sprinkle it over all sides of the chicken pieces. Let them sit for 30 minutes.
  6. Put the chicken in a preheated 350 F (176 C) smoker. Cook it to an internal temperature of 170 F (77 C) in the thickest piece of chicken. It took about 1 hour 15 minutes in my smoker.
  7. Bring the chicken in and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  8. Serve.
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2 thoughts on “Smoke Au Vin”

  1. Nice! I will try this. I’ve not done a wine-based marinade.

    What do you think of making a sauce with the drippings, by putting a foil pan under the chicken while it’s smoking? I find this works well to put some water in the drip pan first (so the fat doesn’t burn, usually quite a bit, e.g., a 2 cups), then you collect the drippings when the chicken is finished smoking.

    I’m in the habit of doing this with pork butt, i.e., mixing the drippings (again, mixed with water, so they don’t burn) with the pulled-pork afterward. It makes it extra smoky, too because the drippings and water after hours, absorb the smoke flavor too.

    1. It is a pleasant change for chicken. As for catching the drippings, I was thinking about giving the marinade a boil to kill any pathogens, adding a chopped-up carrot and celery stalk, and thinning it 50/50 with chicken stock. I would put it in a pan under a rack with as many as possible of the chicken pieces on the rack. I would cook the chicken over the pan and, then, I would strain the liquid and thicken it a bit with whitewash, strain it and use it a sauce that I would hope would be similar to the sauce in Coq au Vin.

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